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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

2 edition of Harvest of stocked chinook salmon in the Ninilchik River sport fishery, 1994 found in the catalog.

Harvest of stocked chinook salmon in the Ninilchik River sport fishery, 1994

Larry E. Marsh

Harvest of stocked chinook salmon in the Ninilchik River sport fishery, 1994

by Larry E. Marsh

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  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish in Anchorage .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook salmon -- Alaska -- Ninilchik River -- Statistics.,
  • Salmon fisheries -- Alaska -- Ninilchik River -- Statistics.,
  • Fish stock assessment -- Alaska -- Ninilchik River -- Statistics.

  • About the Edition

    The Ninilchik River sport fishery harvested an estimated 1,389 stocked chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in 1994. While the total harvest in 1994 declined from previous years, the percent of the harvest that was hatchery fish (45%) was very similar to that of 1992 and 1993. The total 1994 recreational harvest estimated by the Statewide Harvest Survey was 3,108 chinook salmon. An estimated 5,482 chinook salmon were caught during the 1994 season, with a total effort (inclusive of all species) of 21,827 angler-days. Angler participation and harvest of chinook salmon from the three Lower Kenai Peninsula streams (Anchor River, Deep Creek and Ninilchik River) has increased markedly since 1991. The average total harvest at the Ninilchik River for 1991-1994, years when the fishery harvested stocked chinook salmon, is more than seven times the long-term (1966-1990) historical average of 630 fish. While the initial increase in harvest during 1991 was predominately stocked chinook salmon, the average harvest of non-stocked chinook salmon for 1991-1994 is currently more than three times the 1966-1990 average harvest. Weather and water conditions during 1994 were favorable to obtain an escapement index of 859 chinook salmon from the Ninilchik River.

    Edition Notes

    Statementby Larry E. Marsh.
    GenreStatistics.
    SeriesFishery data series -- no. 95-33.
    ContributionsAlaska. Division of Sport Fish.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSH11 .A7542 no.95-33
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 23 p. :
    Number of Pages23
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15577366M

    Chinook salmon are also prized by people who harvest salmon both commercially and for sport. The health of Chinook salmon depends on location—Alaskan stocks are very healthy, while those in the Columbia River are in danger. Protection of Chinook salmon is crucial to maintain healthy Pacific Northwest ecosystems and to provide a delicious food. MANISTEE, MI – Chinook salmon shouldn’t be in short supply in the Great Lakes thanks to the Little Manistee River Weir.. The annual chinook salmon egg-take began Wednesday, Oct. 2.

    A blast from the past! Bob and one of his first Alaskan salmon from the boat basin on the Ninilchik River. Fishing is limited to the lower two miles of river although most anglers fish well below this deadline in fact, the favorite spot is perhaps in the boat basin right at the river's mouth. Hi Everybody. It is time for the weekly spring Chinook Salmon update for the fisheries in the Clearwater River Basin and in the lower Salmon and Little Salmon rivers (Rapid River Run) (5/28/19). Run Update The runs of spring Chinook Salmon over Bonneville Dam that are destined for the Clearwater River and Rapid River are pretty much complete.

    The Chinook salmon / ʃ ɪ ˈ n ʊ k / (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is the largest species in the Pacific salmon genus common name refers to the Chinookan vernacular names for the species include king salmon, Quinnat salmon, spring salmon, chrome hog, and Tyee scientific species name is based on the Russian common name chavycha (чавыча). Spring/Summer Season Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Fishing Season Harvest Summary Clearwater River Drainage Adults Kept Jacks Kept Total Kept Angler Hours Fished Hours Per Fish Kept Unclipped Adults Released Railroad Bridge to Cherrylane Bridge 2 24, 32 98 Cherrylane Bridge to Orofino Bridge 34 11, 44 Orofino Bridge to Kooskia Bridge 0 .


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Harvest of stocked chinook salmon in the Ninilchik River sport fishery, 1994 by Larry E. Marsh Download PDF EPUB FB2

U.S. wild-caught Chinook salmon is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations. NOAA Fisheries works in cooperation with federal, state, tribal, and Canadian officials to manage these commercial, recreational, and tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead in ocean and inland waters of the West Coast and Alaska.

Chinook salmon counts at the Deshka River weir were consistently o fish from tobut since then have been less t fish, and the count was below the minimum escapement goal in and Most of the harvest of Susitna River Chinook salmon is by the inriver sport fishery.

Description: Chinook salmon escapement is monitored at a broodstock weir located approximately 4 miles upstream of the mouth from mid-May through earlyhatchery-reared Chinook salmon have been stocked in the Ninilchik River to support the Chinook salmon sport fishery.

As a result of this stocking program two groups of Chinook salmon (wild and hatchery-reared) return to the. to the Ninilchik River, which has added an additional level of complexity to the management of escapement and harvest of Ninilchik River Chinook salmon. SinceNinilchik River Chinook salmon smolt have also been used in supplementation programs in other areas of the Lower Cook Inlet peninsula (see below).

Arrows show the forecasted returns for Chinook salmon in (solid line) and (dashed line). The mean rank of the ocean ecosystem indicators in was forecasting a return ofandadult spring and fall Chinook salmon to the Bonneville Dam respectively in. Native people were here for the fall fishery.

While today’s Columbia River is more like a series of lakes, for thousands of years, the river was laced with rocky rapids and deep pools that provided good fish habitat and good fishing. Other locations. Other salmon sales locations may be found along the river.

Spring/Summer Season The information on this page reflects harvest results for these river segments. It does not reflect the season status if these stretches are open or closed.

Follow the heading links to find the current season status or browse to our Chinook seasons and rules page. --> Snake River Preliminary Harvest Estimates for JulyClipped. harvest estimate of Ninilchik River Chinook salmon has dropped to under fish. In the mid s, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) Division of Sport Fish (SF) recognized that the Ninilchik River Chinook salmon stock was vulnerable to overharvest from the growing Kenai Peninsula sport fishery.

Chinook salmon are anadromous fish, which means they can live in both fresh and saltwater. Chinook salmon have a relatively complex life history that includes spawning and juvenile rearing in rivers followed by migrating to saltwater to feed, grow, and mature before returning to freshwater to spawn.

For thousands of years, the Columbia has been home to coho, sockeye, chum and steelhead salmon as well as chinook. (See Columbia River Salmon Species) And for thousands of years, the Yakama, Warm Springs, Umatilla and Nez Perce Indians have harvested these fish for commercial purposes and for physical and spiritual sustenance.

Annual Chinook salmon harvests by subsistence and personal use fishers in Alaska averagedfish from to The majority of the subsistence harvest is taken in the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers. U.S. fisheries in Southeast Alaska (SEAK) harvest stocks of Chinook salmon bound for river systems in Alaska, Canada, and the continental U.S.

Thus, fisheries in SEAK are managed under the purview of the Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST), in which an abundance-based management framework is used for Chinook fisheries. Historically, salmon runs in the Columbia River Basin consisted of 16% fall chinook, 12% spring chinook, 30% summer chinook, 11% coho, 23% sockeye, 8% steelhead, and less than 1% chum.

These runs generally extended from March through October. A 'terminal fishery' in the truest sense, the returning salmon have no place to spawn - good news for anglers, bad news for the fish - nearly all the returning fish are available for sport harvest, only a small fraction is needed for an egg take to continue the stocking.

Expected catch of spring chinook salmon from the Snake River at different harvest rates. Curves illustrate natural (wild) production under recent conditions (current) and when survival of downstream migrants is doubled, and natural and hatchery production with outplanting when hatchery programs produce () or () recruits per spawner.

goals were met for the Ninilchik River and all Kachemak Bay terminal saltwater fishery locations. The Ninilchik River Chinook salmon supplementation program has sport fishing opportunities on the continued to provide Ninilchik River and terminal saltwater fisheries.

Continuation of Chinook salmon assessment at Ninilchik River the. Chinook salmon in Alaska have been targeted in size-selective commercial, sport, and subsistence fisheries for over years.

Even when Chinook salmon are not targeted directly, incidental harvest in other fisheries can influence phenotypic distributions in Chinook salmon populations. Two small streams, Deep Creek and the Ninilchik River, both very close to our facilities, provide excellent salmon and trout fishing from the banks.

King salmon are available on weekends only. Opening day is Memorial weekend and the fishery continues for the next 3 weekends. It used to be common to find Chinook salmon 40 inches or more in length, particularly in the Columbia River or Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula and Copper River regions.

The reductions in size could have a long-term impact on the abundance of Chinook salmon, because smaller females carry fewer eggs, so over time the number of fish that hatch and.

The Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is Alaska’s state fish and is one of the most important sport and commercial fish native to the Pacific coast of North is the largest of all Pacific salmon, with weights of individual fish commonly exceeding 30 pounds.

A pound Chinook salmon taken in a fish trap near Petersburg, Alaska in is the largest on record. Intensification of commercial exploitation of chinook salmon in the Columbia River began in Since then, the harvest of chinook salmon can be divided into four phases: Initial development of the fishery ( to ), a period of sustained production with an average annual harvest.

The king, or chinook, salmon are the largest of the salmon species and since the world record for a sport-caught king — a 97 pound and 4 ounce fish — was landed in May by the late Les Anderson, the king fishery on the Kenai River has exploded in both popularity and controversy.With an estimatedupriver chinook returning during the fall run, tribal fishers could harvest overfall chinook throughout the season, representing roughly million pounds of.